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Antiemetics
(listed alphabetically)

  


   


Compazine (Prochlorperazine)
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • very effective for nausea. Often aborts migraine as well when injected IV
  • also available in spansules and suppositories
  • It is not known whether prochlorperazine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
  • It is not known whether prochlorperazine will harm a nursing infant. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
  • possible side effects: extrapyramidal effects, hypotension, fatigue, anxiety and agitation
  • for more information, see phenothiazines
  • FDA approved prescribing information

Haldol (Haloperidol) 
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • relieves pain, nausea, and vomiting
  • oral, injectable, and suppositories
  • It is not known whether haloperidol will harm an unborn baby. Do not take haloperidol without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
  • Haloperidol passes into breast milk. It is not known whether haloperidol will affect a nursing baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
  • possible side effects include: sedation, anticholinergic effects, hypotension, extrapyrimidal effects, confusion
  • contraindications: narrow-angle glaucoma, some prostate conditions, severe hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia

Phenergan (Promethazine) 
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • Promethazine is an antihistamine; used to treat allergic symptoms and reactions such as itching, runny nose; sneezing; itchy, watery eyes; hives; and itchy skin rashes. Also used to cause sedation (sleep), to assist in controlling postoperative pain, to control nausea and vomiting (especially after surgery), and to prevent motion sickness. Also helps other medications work better.
  • oral, injectable, and suppositories
  • FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether promethazine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take promethazine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or if you are planning a pregnancy.
  • It is not known whether promethazine passes into breast milk. Do not take promethazine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
  • Be sure to tell your doctor if you have epilepsy or another seizure disorder; been diagnosed with sleep apnea (periods of not breathing during sleep); glaucoma; an ulcer or an obstruction in your stomach; bladder problems or difficulty urinating; high blood pressure or any type of heart disease; or liver problems.
  • Potential side effects:
    • Discontinue and contact your doctor immediately if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs; jaundice; or abdominal pain.
    • Continue, but talk to your doctor if you experience dizziness, drowsiness, sleepiness, or confusion; blurred vision or a dry mouth; nausea or vomiting; or increased sensitivity to sunlight.

Reglan (Metoclopramide) 
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • relieves pain, nausea, and vomiting
  • oral, injectable, and suppositories
  • lower incidence of side effects than many such drugs, but possible side effects include sedation, anticholinergic effects, hypotension, extrapyrimidal effects, confusion
  • contraindications: narrow-angle glaucoma, some prostate conditions, severe hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia

Thorazine (Chlorpromazine) 
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • relieves pain, nausea, and vomiting
  • oral, injectable, and suppositories
  • very sedating and long-lasting
  • possible side effects include: sedation, anticholinergic effects, hypotension, extrapyramidal effects, confusion
  • contraindications: narrow-angle glaucoma, some prostate conditions, severe hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia

Tigan (Trimethobenzamide) 
  • Rx, antiemetic, neuroleptic
  • relieves pain, nausea, and vomiting
  • oral, injectable, and suppositories
  • although somewhat less effective than some drugs of this type, it is usually well tolerated, and is useful for children
  • possible side effects include: sedation, anticholinergic effects, hypotension, extrapyrimidal effects, confusion
  • contraindications: narrow-angle glaucoma, some prostate conditions, severe hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia

Zofran (Ondansentron) 
  • Rx, antiemetic
  • relieves nausea, and vomiting
  • tablets or tablets that dissolve on the tongue
  • fewer side effects than most antiemetics
  • not sedating
  • FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not likely to harm an unborn baby. Do not take ondansetron without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or if you are planning a pregnancy.
  • It is also not known whether ondansetron passes into breast milk. Do not take ondansetron without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
  • Be sure to tell your doctor if you have liver disease.
  • Potential side effects:
    • Discontinue use and contact your doctor immediately if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); irregular heartbeats; or muscle cramps or uncontrollable movements.
    • Continue use and talk to your doctor is you experience headache; fatigue, drowsiness, or dizziness; anxiety or agitation; or diarrhea or constipation.

Material on this page is for informational purposes only,
and should not be construed as medical advice.
Always consult your physician or pharmacist regarding medications.

 


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